Archive for Terrorist

How to Prepare Your “Stealth Halal” Turkey (Recipe Included)

Posted in Food, Islam, Media with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 24, 2011 by irydhan

The Halal Turkey

Originally Posted on ILLUME: http://www.illumemagazine.com/zine/articleDetail.php?Terrorists-Enlist-Turkeys-for-Jihad-Pam-Gellar-13862

Recently, bikini-blogger and Islamophobe extraordinaire, Pamela Gellar issued a warning that the Butterball Company is supporting international terrorism by providing “Stealth Halal” Turkeys to American families.

Gellar states on her website:

Across this great country, on Thanksgiving tables nationwide, infidel Americans are unwittingly going to be serving halal turkeys to their families this Thursday. Turkeys that are halal certified — who wants that, especially on a day on which we are giving thanks to G-d for our freedom? I wouldn’t knowingly buy a halal turkey — would you? Halal turkey, slaughtered according to the rules of Islamic law, is just the opposite of what Thanksgiving represents: freedom and inclusiveness, neither of which are allowed for under that same Islamic law.

Geller also calls on those who share her viewpoint to boycott the company.

Of course Gellar doesn’t realize that Butterball, a global company, is catering to their international market, which includes 10 Muslim-majority countries such as Saudi Arabia and Iraq.

Here is a statement from Butterball’s international website:

As an international turkey provider, we have the expertise in serving different countries and different customs, and will work with you to meet any and all product needs. We have met the requirements for the following certifications: USDA Approved, Russian Approved, Halal Certified, and employ a Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HAACP) food safety system with Good Manufacturing processes. From great customer service to new product innovation to the proper certifications, Butterball has the experience you need to get our great tasting turkey in your market.

There are approximately 8 million Muslims in America, and the vast majority probably do not care if their Turkey is halal certified. But of course many Muslims, such as myself, do enjoy eating halal Turkey and spending time with close friends and family during Thanksgiving. Ironically, most Muslim-Americans feel that Thanksgiving is very similar to the Islamic holiday of Eid-ul-Adha, where another type of animal (a goat or lamb) is shared over the dinner table with family.

Here’s a recipe for preparing that “Stealth Halal” Turkey.

Mediterranean Style Turkey

by Nyela Goraya

Ingredients

  • 1 cup cashews
  • 2/3 cup butter
  • 1/4 cup orange juice
  • 1/4 cup tangerine juice
  • 2/3 cup lemon juice
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground thyme
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon paprika
  • 1 (10 pound) whole turkey
  • salt and ground black pepper to taste
  • 1 pound ground beef
  • 1/4 cup chopped onion
  • 1 cup uncooked rice (soaked)
  • 1/4 cup pine nuts
  • 1/4 cup raisins (optional)
  • 1/3 cup butter
  • 1/2 cup chicken broth
  • 2 tablespoons apple juice
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper

Directions

  • Preheat oven to 325 degrees F (165 degrees C).
  • Take cashews and place in a skillet over medium heat. Cook until toasted. Remove from heat, and chop.
  • Then Melt 2/3 cup butter in a saucepan.  Add the cumin, thyme, cinnamon and paprika. Mix in the orange juice, tangerine juice, and lemon juice. Rub the turkey inside and out with the mixture, reserving some for basting.
  • Season turkey with salt and pepper.
  • In a large skillet over medium heat, cook the ground beef and onion until beef is evenly brown and onion is tender. Drain grease. Mix in the rice. Stir in the cashews, pine nuts, raisins, 1/3 cup butter, broth, and apple juice. Season with 1 teaspoon salt and 1/2 teaspoon pepper.
  • Continue cooking until all liquid has been absorbed. Stuff all turkey cavities with the mixture,
  • and tie in place with kitchen twine.
  • Put turkey on a rack in a roasting pan, and cover breast and thighs with aluminum foil.
  • Pour about 1/4 inch water into the bottom of the pan.
  • Roast turkey in the preheated oven 3 to 4 hours, brushing occasionally with remaining butter and juice mixture.
  • Increase oven temperature to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C) during final hour of roasting, and remove foil.
  • Cook turkey to a minimum internal temperature of 180 degrees F (82 degrees C).

Enjoy Your Thanksgiving!

Rizwan Manji: Taking Jobs From White America

Posted in Books/Magazines, Islam, Media, TV/Film with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 18, 2010 by irydhan

I interviewed actor Rizwan Manji from NBC’s “Outsourced” for ILLUME Magazine (www.IllumeMag.com).
He talked about what its like to be Muslim in Hollywood and the importance of  ‘good Muslim’ roles.

How did you get the part of Rajiv Gidwani on NBC’s “Outsourced” ?

I was sent the script for the Pilot and thought it was hilarious.  As an Indian, I could relate to some of the characters who share the same culture as me, and this was the first time that I have heard of a major TV sitcom about South Asian culture.  I initially was called in to audition for the role of Gupta (played by Parvesh Cheena) and did not get the role, but after the producers could not find a suitable actor for the role of Rajiv, they called me in again and I got the part.

Many people who watched the pilot episode, felt the show was filled with too many stereotypes and was not really a funny show.  How do you respond?

The pilot episode was basically a quick introduction to all the eight main characters.  We basically have 22 minutes to introduce each person and you don’t really have much time to go into that much detail of each character.  It is a pretty standard set-up as most TV sitcoms and if you have seen other shows such as Friends, etc. you will see that in the beginning they quickly introduce each character and you see how each character is on the surface (i.e. so and so is the dumb character, etc.).  The main goal of any sitcom is to entertain and establish an audience who is willing to come back to watch again.

Will the TV show go into the different religions of the characters or stay focused on the culture of India?

Currently there is one call center worker, Samina, who is a Muslim women who wears Hijab (played by a Non-Muslim) and she does interact with my character (my character is Hindu) in a future episode, but at this point in time the TV series is not focusing on religion and when references are made it is mostly the Hindu religion.

As a Muslim of South Asian descent, you are familiar with the tradition of parents limiting their children’s field of study to medicine or engineering.  How did your parents react to your decision to get into acting and were they supportive of you?

I was pretty lucky, because my family was very supportive of me.  At first my parents did not really understand why I wanted to be an actor and also how I would be able to make a living out of it, since they came from a background, like most South Asian parents, of leaving their homeland (Tanzania), going to another country (Canada) and working hard to allow their children to go to a good university so they can become a doctor or lawyer, etc.  My parents never told me no for acting, but they did encourage me to go to school and get a degree as a back-up plan.  I did go to school in Alberta for one year, but afterwards decided that I want to study acting at the “American Musical and Dramatic Academy” in the United States.  It was difficult to get in and also I didn’t have any money to pay for tuition, so I obviously had to ask my parents for help.  I thank my sister, who really was able to sit down with my parents and convince them that this is what I really wanted to do.  Now, my father is really excited about the whole acting thing and whenever he spots an opportunity for a South Asian role, he tells me to apply for it and kinda acts like my manager!

As a Muslim, do you think it is important for more Muslims to get involved with acting in TV and Films?

Definitely.  Muslims need to be involved and active.  TV is watched all over the world, especially TV which is produced here in America.  It is the most visible platform we have now.  If majority of the world sees only evil Muslim characters and roles on TV, that is detrimental to everyone, not just Muslims.  There needs to be a greater presence of Muslims on TV.

Were you offered any negative roles in terms of portrayal of Muslims and how did you respond?

Yes, I received many offers which portrayed Muslims in the stereotypical manner of just killing someone and yelling something in Arabic.  I turned down many of these roles.   But some of them I did debate whether to take them or not.  For example, I was offered several roles to be a terrorist  on the series “24”, which I turned down, but in the last season, they had several characters who were “good guy” Muslims (such as Anil Kapoor’s character).  So when I was offered a job to play a small role of a bad guy, I accepted it, since I saw that a major character was portraying a “good brown Muslim person”, so it wasn’t a one sided thing, where all the muslim characters are bad.  But I do struggle with these roles and turn down something if it makes me feel uncomfortable.

What advice do you have for young Muslims who are interested in becoming actors?

If it’s your passion, then go for it.  But don’t think that you will become rich quick.  It’s a struggle and is not easy work.  I have been working in this business for 15 years now, and had to do a lot of side jobs along the way.  There is very little money in the beginning.  But if you like it and have a passion for it, then do it!

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